What Did We Do When There Was No Internet?

ab04ae9815e6771ae97eed3e8c5e9a44.jpgWhen I think back to my childhood, I’m grateful for a time when technology hadn’t been as nearly prevalent in our lives. We weren’t surrounded by a screen for a significant amount of the day, and we cherished the moments of going to the cinema to watch a film or played outside in the grass. Children didn’t have any phones in their hands, and there were more eye contact and in-person interaction. We’d hop on over to the neighbour’s house, bounce on the trampolines to play and walk to the beach together. If the internet disappeared tomorrow, what would happen?

There were always shelves of books at home, and almost every weekend we would stop at the local library to borrow books. If I wasn’t practising my flute or piano, playing with the animals or walking around the farm, I’d be reading a book, drawing a picture or playing with my toys. The difference now is that children grow up playing games on a screen, interacting with one another through online and are growing up learning through technology. I felt that we still experienced that feeling in a classroom with only a pen and paper, writing our essays by hand.

Til this day, even at university, I prefer writing with a pen to paper. There are certain things that are still preferred without the internet, such as reading a book or a magazine. There’s nothing quite like having the physical element of a book and being able to flip through each page. Before technology became what it is, life seemed far more innocent and thinking back, we spent a lot of time outdoors running around, and more time talking to strangers. The lack of technology meant there was no form of escapism, and so everyone would talk to one another.

When there were moments that you wanted to escape, you’d draw or read a book in class. I’m sure children now have just as many hobbies, however, I can’t help feel that back then the lack of screens meant that we spent more time exploring with our imagination, and trying new things. We’d spend time going to drawing classes, going to ballet classes, learning new instruments, learning new languages and spending our time experimenting what we like and don’t like, and finding our own unique ways to entertain ourselves and use our time.

In many ways, it was far more polite back then, because if you think about it, anyone who uses their phone constantly when they’re with other people, are not really presently there with them. Creativity meant writing little stories, going outside to explore nature and always craving a sense of learning. It meant researching and getting books out to do your projects. I still remember listening to Beethovens Tape to sleep, and the fact that there is barely anyone who still listens to the tape, even though it was only over 10 years ago.

Simplicity and interactivity would be the two things that I think of, that have changed in a drastic way. The way we interact with people has changed immensely, and the simplicity of life has become noisier with the chaotic nature of the online world. In anything, there requires a balance, as too much excess of anything makes it a negative. This means Social Media, the internet and the online digital world can have their positives, but it’s all a matter of balance. We live in a time where things are changing at a rapid rate.

We live in a time where businesses rely heavily on having the internet, students need the internet in order to do research and individuals have the internet to stay connected to news, entertainment and socialising. The moments the internet decides to say goodbye for an hour or two, that’s when I realise that the things I do go back to reading, listening to music, going outside for a walk or writing on paper. They go back to the things that we’d do if there was no internet. Communication was learned through a different way growing up, compared to the way it is now. Even though I was painfully shy, I was forced to interact with people, which is the natural way.

Meeting people (whether friends or dating) were done in person, sending an email meant sitting down to write a letter and going to the post office to send it and calling a friend meant sitting on a chair where the phone had a wire on it. There was a sense of greater patience we had because the internet is so greatly convenient and fast. I still remember rather than spending 2 hours online, we’d spend 2 hours playing with the cat or going out to slide down the hills on cardboard boxes. There was a sense of innocence. There was a sense of still not knowing many things, but now with the internet children can know things from such a young age.

Remembering life before the internet was a part of our lives reminds us of how much has changed. It reminds us to stay true to our own core values in a trending world. It reminds us that no one used to know what someone was eating on a Saturday night, until the week after when they would tell you in person all about the delicious meal they cooked. It meant meeting someone in person, before knowing what they looked like from a photo or their profile. It meant playing games together, rather than sitting in a circle looking down at a screen. I miss those elements of simplicity and not knowing everything, but each period of time is a different stage in history, and this is just one of them.

Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady (1964)

 

The Life Portrait Of Coco Chanel

81WC0ArtEtLLife Portraits: Coco Chanel by Zena Alkayat and Nina Cosford is such a lovely, yet informative book. I read it in one sitting and absolutely fell in love with the drawings, the words and the simplicity of it.  I don’t consider myself as someone who will go out of my way to buy luxury fashion unless it’s second hand! However, I’ve always had a curiosity and interest in the history and designer that created their own brand. It was interesting to know how Chanel started her incredible company as a couture designer. Her beginnings would be what lead her to be known as one of the most well-respected designers in the fashion industry.52-53-1
The book is a wonderful coffee table book or collectors edition, that gives an insight into Chanel’s life. Growing up as an orphan in a French convent, she opens her own fashion house and sets off on several love affairs. As one of the twentieth century’s most exceptional couture designers, Chanel pioneered a modern way to dress that is practical as it is glamorous.  She famously invented the little black dress. This beautifully illustrated biography follows Chanel’s fascinating life and work, traces her inspirations and experiences, and celebrates the legacy of this fashion icon. See a little snippet inside of the magical book of a fashion icon here. All images are from Nina Cosford.120-121When I read stories like these, it’s a reminder that everyone goes through their own failures. It’s the persistence, passion, creativity, hard work, motivation and fire that keeps us going. It’s a message to not give up on what makes you happy and gives your life meaning. There are always going to be barriers or those who will try to bring you down, but at the end of the day, you are the one person who needs to believe in yourself the most, in order to achieve what you want. On a side note, the skirt suit above reminds me of Cate Blanchett in Blue Jasmine in the charming Chanel suit!34-35

Edun Fall Ready-To-Wear Collection 2017

11-edun-fall-17Edun is a sustainable fashion label, found in 2005 by Ali Hewson and her husband, Bono. Its collections of clothing, accessories and jewellery are a reflection of local craftsmanship. The Fall collection features an eclectic, bold colourful palette and elusive design collective drew inspiration for textures and hues from the contemporary artist Mickalene Thomas. Featuring graphic patterns, cropped motorcycle jacket, chunky sweaters and zebra prints. The clothes were crafted in partnership with several different organisations Africa, including the Ethical Fashion Initiative in Burkina Faso and designer Carole Nevin in South Africa. 09-edun-fall-1701-edun-fall-1721-edun-fall-1722-edun-fall-1727-edun-fall-17All images from original website

Conversations On Being Kind From Your Heart

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There is such simplicity in saying be kind, and at the same time, deep down in my heart, there are days where I feel as if I wasn’t as kind as I could be, or that I could have done something this or that way. Perhaps that’s just the empathetic side of me that feels this way. Last year I wrote a post about speaking from the heart because I find that it doesn’t happen the way it used to. There is an effect that technology has where we have the ability to talk online, which may cause us to be less emotional. When we talk in person, being raw is sometimes perceived as a weakness when it shouldn’t be.

Kindness is not those who do it to gain something, those who do it for attention or those who want to be perceived a certain way. True kindness is one that could be completely invisible to the eye but felt by others. It’s important to note that true kindness is ultimately loving yourself. It’s funny how sometimes we’re much kinder and far less judgmental towards others, but when it comes to ourselves, we can sometimes be harsh critics. It makes me think to when I had depression quite badly, there were thoughts that were so terrible and awful, that I’d never say to anyone else, but I said it to myself.

Being kind from your heart means seeing a person for their character and actions, rather than appearances. It means seeing a person on the street with a sad face, and picturing giving them a big warm hug (does anyone else do this as well!). Taking the time to listen to a friend and be there for them. Sometimes kindness is being very honest, which can make us feel unkind. However, it’s far better to be honest to a close one if you think they’re doing something wrong. It means you care for them and want the best for them. Kindness from your heart could be spending the time to cook a meal for a loved one.

It’s the ability to be tolerant and understanding, without judgment towards someone. It’s the time taken to help someone, not for any rewards, but simply because it gives a sense of connection. Helping and having compassion is something that encourages others and ourselves to do more of.  It’s the ability to truly understand that every person is different and that we can’t change people. Sometimes it means knowing when to say yes and no. This one is important. Honesty has a strong tie with kindness because the truth will always reveal itself.

Actions speak louder than words. Think of Pride & Prejudice, and the way Elizabeth felt Darcy was incredibly arrogant and full of pride when really he was simply shy and reserved with his words. However, his actions showed that he was loving, caring and kind. We are all capable of spreading a light in our lives. You know that feeling of catching a smile from the distance, and feeling positive energy run through your body. No one can be happy all the time, but when we’re kind to other’s, we can spread that light and form a silent connection. Kindness is an invisible way of healing and gives a feeling of warmth and love.

Photography by Milton H. Greene 

Discover These Fashion Magazines From New Zealand

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Apparel Magazine 

Monthly magazine for the apparel industry, read by designers, manufacturers, wholesalers, distributors, fashion students and graduates, service providers. Established in 1969, Apparel magazine is a monthly trade publication that is a comprehensive insight into the clothing, textiles, footwear and accessories industries. Apparel covers every aspect of the fashion industry from marketing, import, wholesale and retail apparel, footwear and textiles, to logistics, technology, recruitment and industry-related education aspects.

Black Magazine

Black Magazine is an international fashion, beauty, arts and culture magazine published from New Zealand for the people of the world. Founded by Grant Fell and Rachael Churchward in 2006, and created by teams of contributors in New Zealand, Australia, New York, London and Paris, Black is more than a magazine, it is a vision of the world expressed through the creativity of its creators and contributors across a multi-media platform.

Chinese Eye Magazine

Launched in 2016, Chinese Eye Magazine is a lifestyle magazine released annually focused on fashion, beauty, cuisine, horse racing, motoring, travel and lifestyle. New Zealand is growing and we all need to grow with it. It is important to Eye that the Chinese Eye Magazine understands what drives, motivates, inspires, relaxes, interests and entertains its readers and puts New Zealand’s top products and services at the forefront of this rising market.

Eye Magazine

Eye Magazine was launched in 1997 as a lifestyle quarterly focused on fashion, beauty, cuisine, racing, motoring, travel, house and garden. The magazine has built a strong base of loyal clients who repeatedly use the publication to reach their target audience. This is because Eye Magazine understands what drives, motivates, inspires, relaxes, interests and entertains its readers.

Denizen Magazine

Based in Auckland, New Zealand the Denizen is a multimedia platform that celebrates the art of living well from a New Zealand perspective. Denizen launched in September 2010, the Denizen website has fast become the go-to online destination for those in the know. Updated daily with inspiring content, the Denizen keeps style aficionados abreast of the new and the noteworthy happenings around them. 

Fashion Quarterly

Fashion Quarterly’s entire existence is fashion and beauty. Anyone with a passing interest in a seasonal wardrobe update, knows the magazine literally lives and breathes fashion and beauty. As such, it really is the first port of call for readers desperate to get their hands on the latest and greatest. And Fashion Quarterly doesn’t disappoint. It’s crammed with stunning photography that is inspirational and aspirational. What’s more, the serious fashion journalism helps readers understand incoming trends.

M2 Magazine

For over 12 years we have curated engaging content that helps them be the best that they can be. These aren’t people who drift through life, they think, plan and take action. They are committed to lifelong learning. Driven to take their lives to the next level by smashing their goals. They are the leaders, the owners and the investors. Not the sheep. From the latest reviews of the Cars you should own, the Success tips to further your career, business, health and business. 

M2woman Magazine

M2woman is the intelligent woman’s lifestyle brand, available in print, web, email and mobile. M2woman is one of the few New Zealand magazines to target professional, forward-thinking, style-driven metropolitan woman, this unique bi-monthly magazine covers entertainment, fashion and beauty, health and fitness, food and travel, whilst also delving into technology, politics, business and the successful lives of local and international women alike.

Remix Magazine

Remix magazine is your source for the very latest fashion, beauty, lifestyle and culture inspiration from New Zealand and around the globe. Founded in Auckland, New Zealand, Remix is a leading voice for what’s hot in the creative industries, presenting unique editorial content from a dedicated editorial team and growing list of international contributors. Remix prides itself on original content for a global readership, showcasing conceptually driven photography, in-depth feature articles, hard-hitting interviews and honest reviews. 

Simply You Style

From finding that perfect accessory for a special occasion, to the essential jacket that will become a lasting addition to any wardrobe, this is the magazine for women who love to shop. Simply You covers how to work the season’s trends, with an edit from local designers and beauty brands across the country. Simply You is the quintessential fashion guide for women who want up-to-date advice on the latest trends – and how to wear them their own way.

All descriptions and images belong to the original company

Stella McCartney Fall Collection 2017

SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_1The Stella McCartney Fall collection for 2017 is filled with eclectic energy with bold explosions of colour and unexpected detailing. I love the slight masculine cut in the long coats and the oversized bags. Featuring my favourite looks, however, this season includes fringes, hot pink, red and eveningwear dresses. The gowns have geometric proportions and a lengthier fringe. The style is transformed from the striking red into a midnight feeling with dark tones and panels of bolder blue.SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_3SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_6SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_14SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_15SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_25SMC_A17_LB_NY-EVENT_LR_30All images from original website

How Would You Describe Your Personal Style?

5250293e2587e6ee302c64c5838250c1.jpgIt’s been such a lovely week, even through all the windy days and umbrellas going inside out. It’s the kind where you walk around feeling your mind smiling because even though it’s cold there’s a certain positive feeling inside of you that you can’t quite explain. Even when they’re days where I felt a bit down, they were simple reminders of what I’m grateful for. Over the years, I have more appreciation for the saying, less is more. This means purchasing items you really know you’ll wear again and again over the years, rather than a sporadic purchase. It also means letting your style speak for itself.1202153Personal style reflects how we may feel, how we choose to express ourselves and sometimes it might evolve or change over the years. I recently talked to a dear friend about personal style. The most important thing is wearing things we feel drawn to, inspired by and comfortable in. They’re simply pieces of clothing that we feel we’re ourselves in, and they express our personality at a glance. What we wear should stay true to ourselves and who we believe we are. The personal styles I like are Rooney Mara, Cate Blancett, Alexa Chung, Alicia Vikander and Victoria Beckham to name a few. 1483821262.jpgPersonal style is more important than trends. There’s nothing wrong with purchasing things that are trending if you genuinely like it, but if you only purchase things because they are trending, then it’s trickier to develop your own style. That is the great thing about thrifting because you can find some treasures that may no longer be sold in most stores. I remember going through a stage of peter pan collars, florals, lace stockings and red nail polish. Over the years, I feel most myself in black, grey, nude, navy and white. Although, sometimes it’s nice to add a splash of colour!harper-and-harley_ruffle-white-top-sleeves_cropped-pants_style_outfit_2-mmvys00q4fh1oc8l1m398z29csosf2msw8rm6oy78o.jpgMinimalism is a lifestyle that encourages living with less, and more of things that we value. My first introduction to minimalism started when I discovered Harper & Harley three years ago. Sara embodies the nature of minimalism and wearing a black, white, nude and navy palette with elegance, simplicity and feminity. Before I discovered her or heard about the concept of minimalism, I used to buy an excess of clothing that I only ended up wearing a few times. Personal style can express the lifestyle we inhabit and how we want to express ourselves.

How would you describe your personal style?